All Sessions Eastern Time

Thursday, June 3, 2021 

10:00 am – 10:45 amAALS Section on Minority Groups – Informal Gathering and Q & AEmile Loza de Siles, Duquesne University School of Law
11:00 am – 11:15 pm WelcomeVincent D. Rougeau, AALS President and Boston College Law School
11:00 am – 11:15 amWorkshop OverviewBrian R. Gallini, Willamette University College of Law, Chair, Workshop for New School Teachers
11:15 am – 12:15 pmGeneral Session: Foundations for Excellent TeachingModerator: Christopher Ide-Don, University of California, Davis, School of Law

Eloise Pasachoff, Georgetown University Law Center

Sophie M. Sparrow, University of New Hampshire Franklin Pierce School of Law
Effective teachers understand that what learners bring to the classroom is just as important as what the teachers bring. This plenary session will review academic research on student learning, teaching theory, and teaching strategies and then link that discussion to practical advice for excellence in classroom teaching. Awareness of the learning and teaching research can help teachers to promote a positive classroom experience and improve outcomes.
12:15 pm – 12:30 pm Break
12:30 pm – 1:15 pmConcurrent Sessions on TeachingHoward Katz, Cleveland-Marshall College of Law at Cleveland State University

Michael H. Schwartz, University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law
How to plan your course for best effect, considering topics such as choosing a casebook, constructing a syllabus, and deciding what to cover and in what order.
12:30 pm – 1:15 pmBreakout Session: Faculty Teaching Legal Analysis, Writing, and ResearchWanda M. Temm, University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Law

Danielle Tully, Northeastern University School of Law   
How to get the most teaching bang for your buck out of every legal writing assignment. Whether you are teaching a traditional legal writing course or are looking for ways to incorporate writing assignments into a doctrinal course, maximizing the value your students get out of an assignment is challenging. This session will introduce a number of techniques, grounded in learning theory, that maximize how much students learn from each writing assignment.
12:30 pm – 1:15 pmBreakout Session: Inside the ClassroomMartha M. Ertman, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law

Jennifer Freeland, University of California, Hastings College of the Law
How to be an effective teacher in the law school classroom: ideas on how to develop your own teaching style, give students more assessment during the semester, and make class more interactive.
12:30 pm – 1:15 pmBreakout Session: Outside the ClassroomLawrence C. Levine, University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law

Mai Linh Spencer, University of California, Hastings College of the Law
How to interact with students outside the classroom including supervising research assistants, mentoring a broad range of students, and setting appropriate boundaries.
12:30 pm – 1:15 pmBreakout Session: Teaching with TechnologyApril Gordon Dawson, North Carolina Central University School of Law

Hari Michele Osofsky, The Pennsylvania State University – Penn State Law
How to use information technology effectively, including visual aids, polling, class websites, distance learning, and student use of computers in the classroom.
1:15 pm – 2:00 pmGeneral Session on Race in the ClassroomModerator: Anthony Paul Farley, Albany Law School

Susan S. Kuo, University of South Carolina School of Law

Tamara F. Lawson, St. Thomas University School of Law

Russell A. McClain, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law
All law teachers have to think about ways to teach, mentor, and collaborate effectively in a diverse community. This session will discuss the special challenges all faculty members sometimes face in their roles of teacher, mentor, and institutional citizen at a time of political polarization. It will also address the responsibility that all faculty members have to promote the meaningful inclusion of all students and discuss strategies for doing so both inside and outside the classroom.
2:00 pm – 2:45 pmBreakout Sessions on Race in the Classroom
2:00 pm – 2:45 pmBreakout Session: Difficult Classroom ConversationsSusan S. Kuo, University of South Carolina School of Law
Today’s classroom’s environment is on the one hand more socially diverse and on the other hand more politically polarized. As professors we are charged with telling the truth about history and the law, yet we must also be sensitive to the needs and perspectives of our changing student body. This breakout session will focus on the various strategies for navigating difficult conversations within this new social and educational landscape.
2:00 pm – 2:45 pmBreakout Session: Helping Faculty Navigate Student CommunicationsTamara F. Lawson, St. Thomas University School of Law
In a classroom each participate, including the professor, may differ from one another in race, ethnicity and/or cultural or socioeconomic background. How do professors promote a robust learning environment where challenging issues can be raised, vetted, embraced or rejected? What are ways professors can examine their own beliefs, values, and biases so they can transparently connect with each student and assist all students to effectively engage with one another?
2:00 pm – 2:45 pmBreakout Session: Proactive Student EngagementRussell A. McClain, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law
Difficult conversations around race can sometimes stunt honest conversations in the classroom. Therefore, professors must be intentional in thinking about pedagogical strategies for encouraging proactive student engagement in the face of these social challenges. How do we both encourage the freedom of thought and inquiry while also being clear about the facts of the case or truth of the past.
2:45 pm – 3:00 pmBreak
3:00 pm – 4:00 pmGeneral Session on AssessmentModerator: Laurie B. Zimet, University of California, Hastings College of the Law

Rory D. Bahadur, Washburn University School of Law

Kris Franklin, New York Law School
In this interactive session, participants will learn different methods to evaluate students and provide feedback throughout the semester. The session will also cover exam creation, grading, and post-exam review.
4:00 pm – 4:15 pmBreak
4:15 pm – 5:15 pmGeneral Session: The Demands and Delights of Institutional Citizenship: Exploring a Range of Service
Opportunities
Moderator: Sudha N. Setty, Western New England University School of Law

Danielle M. Conway, The Pennsylvania State University – Dickinson Law

Nestor M. Davidson, Fordham University School of Law
In addition to producing influential scholarship and facilitating effective student learning, law professors are also called upon to be good institutional citizens (and committee members) by furthering law school priorities and contributing to multiple institutional relationships with students, staff, faculty, university officials, community members, alumni, and practicing lawyers and judges. Such interactions can present exciting opportunities, but it is especially important for junior faculty to consider how to prioritize among them and balance the competing demands on their time.
5:15 pm – 6:15 pmSmall Group Discussions
Participants will convene in small group cohorts with speakers who will facilitate the discussions to reflect on ideas related to the topics on teaching, race in the classroom, diversity, assessment and service.
6:30 pm – 7:30 pmAALS Section on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Issues – Informal Gathering and Q & AMichael J. Higdon, University of Tennessee College of Law
 
Shaakirrah Sanders, University of Idaho College of Law
 
Kyle C. Velte, University of Kansas School of Law

Friday, June 4, 2021

TimeSession NameSpeakers
10:00 am – 10:45 amAALS Section on Women in Legal Education: Informal Gathering and Q&AModerator:
Susan Bisom-Rapp, California Western School of Law

Speakers:
Emily T. Behzadi, California Western School of Law

Susan D. Rozelle, Stetson University College of Law

Lisa A. Mazzie, Marquette University Law School

Lolita K. Buckner Iniss, SMU Dedman School of Law

Nancy J. Soonpaa, Texas Tech University School of Law

Catherine Hardee, California Western School of Law

Kerri L. Stone, Florida International University College of Law
11:00 am – 11:45 amGeneral Session: Why Scholarship MattersModerator:
Brian R. Gallini, Willamette University College of Law, Chair

Speakers:
Mario L. Barnes, University of Washington School of Law

Nancy Levit, University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Law
In an era of “alternative facts,” good legal scholarship is of the highest importance. Law is essential to constitutionalism, democracy, and markets, but law is often in need of improvement. Good legal scholarship fosters better understandings of law and how law operates. In so doing, it provides a foundation for reform where needed. Professor Jackson will discuss these points and explore how many different forms of legal scholarship contribute to law’s ability to provide both needed stability and needed change.
11:45 am – 1:00 pmConcurrent Sessions on Scholarship
The following concurrent sessions offer focused discussion on a variety of topics important to legal scholarship. Each session will be offered twice so that you have the opportunity to attend two of your choosing.
11:45 am – 1:00 pmConcurrent Session – Designing Your Research AgendaFacilitator:
Jonathan Marshfield, University of Nebraska College of Law
How to conceptualize and articulate the themes of your scholarship and research trajectory.
11:45 am – 1:00 pmConcurrent Session – Building a Scholarly Community/NetworkFacilitator: Lisa M. Fairfax, The George Washington University Law Schoo
How to form a community of readers and like-minded scholars inside and outside of your institution.
11:45 am – 1:00 pmConcurrent Session – Distributing Your IdeasFacilitators:
Khaled.Beydoun, Wayne State University Law School

Anthony Michael Kreis, Georgia State University College of Law
How to distribute your scholarship and build your reputation through both academic channels and popular media.
11:45 am – 1:00 pmConcurrent Session – Challenges of Interdisciplinary ScholarshipFacilitator:
Madhavi Sunder, Georgetown University Law Center
How to do research in multiple fields and speak to multiple audiences in your scholarship.
11:45 am – 1:00 pmConcurrent Session – Scholarship for Faculty Teaching Legal Analysis, Research, and WritingFacilitators:
Steven K. Homer, University of New Mexico School of Law

Danielle Weatherby, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Robert A. Leflar Law Center
How to develop an authentic research agenda and stay engaged with your scholarly agenda while also teaching time-intensive legal writing and skills courses.
11:45 am – 1:00 pmConcurrent Session – Engaged Scholarship and AdvocacyFacilitators:
Renee McDonald Hutchins, University of the District of Columbia David A. Clarke School of Law

Maybell Romero, Northern Illinois University College of Law
How to maximize the impact of your scholarship.
1:00 pm – 1:30 pmLunch Break
1:30 pm – 2:45 pmConcurrent Sessions on Scholarship
The following concurrent sessions offer focused discussion on a variety of topics important to legal scholarship. Each session will be offered twice so that you have the opportunity to attend two of your choosing.
1:30 pm – 2:45 pmConcurrent Session – Designing Your Research AgendaFacilitator:
Jonathan Marshfield, University of Nebraska College of Law

Hari Michele Osofsky, The Pennsylvania State University – Penn State Law
How to conceptualize and articulate the themes of your scholarship and research trajectory.
1:30 pm – 2:45 pmConcurrent Session – Building a Scholarly Community/NetworkFacilitator: Lisa M. Fairfax, The George Washington University Law Schoo
How to form a community of readers and like-minded scholars inside and outside of your institution.
1:30 pm – 2:45 pmConcurrent Session – Distributing Your IdeasFacilitators:
Khaled.Beydoun, Wayne State University Law School

Anthony Michael Kreis, Georgia State University College of Law
How to distribute your scholarship and build your reputation through both academic channels and popular media.
1:30 pm – 2:45 pmConcurrent Session – Challenges of Interdisciplinary ScholarshipFacilitator:
Madhavi Sunder, Georgetown University Law Center
How to do research in multiple fields and speak to multiple audiences in your scholarship.
1:30 pm – 2:45 pmConcurrent Session – Scholarship for Faculty Teaching Legal Analysis, Research, and WritingFacilitators:
Steven K. Homer, University of New Mexico School of Law

Danielle Weatherby, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Robert A. Leflar Law Center
How to develop an authentic research agenda and stay engaged with your scholarly agenda while also teaching time-intensive legal writing and skills courses.
1:30 pm – 2:45 pmConcurrent Session – Engaged Scholarship and AdvocacyFacilitators:
Renee McDonald Hutchins, University of the District of Columbia David A. Clarke School of Law

Maybell Romero, Northern Illinois University College of Law
How to maximize the impact of your scholarship.
2:45 pm – 3:00 pmBreak
3:00 pm – 4:00 pmGeneral Session: Keeping it All TogetherModerator:
Bridgette Baldwin, Western New England University School of Law

Speakers:
Jill C. Anderson, University of Connecticut School of Law
Erin E. Buzuvis, Western New England University School of Law
Joshua P. Fershee, Creighton University School of Law
Law can be a demanding profession, for both practitioners and for legal academics. This panel considers ways to enhance work and life satisfaction for law teachers, and also considers the teacher’s role in helping students pursue professional fulfillment and personal well-being.
4:00 pm – 4:15 pmBreak
4:15 pm – 5:15 pmSmall Group Discussions
Participants will convene again in small group cohorts with speakers who will facilitate the discussion to reflect on ideas related to teaching, scholarship, and service that have been raised throughout the workshop.
5:15 pm – 5:30 pmWorkshop Wrap-UpBrian R. Gallini, Willamette University College of Law, Chair, Workshop for New Law School Teachers
5:30 pm – 6:30 pmInformal Happy Hour by Subjecto Civil Procedure
o Contracts
o Criminal Law
o Legal Writing, Reasoning and Research
o Property
o Torts
o Your Choice
Attendees and speakers will gather informally for happy hour in Gather Town.